My sisters keeper

My Sisters Keeper Weitere Formate

Die junge Kate Fitzgerald wächst in einer wohlbehüteten Familie auf und führt ein unbeschwertes Leben - bis sie eines Tages erfährt, dass sie Leukämie hat. Sie braucht einen Organspender. Weder ihre Eltern noch ihr Bruder Jesse sind dafür geeignet. Beim Leben meiner Schwester (Originaltitel: My Sister's Keeper) ist ein US-​amerikanisches Filmdrama aus dem Jahr Regie führte Nick Cassavetes, die. Beim Leben meiner Schwester (original: My Sister's Keeper) ist ein Buch der US-​amerikanischen Autorin Jodi Picoult, das im englischsprachigen Original. My Sister's Keeper: A Novel | Picoult, Jodi | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. My Sister's Keeper: stallmlinderoth.se: Picoult, Jodi: Fremdsprachige Bücher.

my sisters keeper

Beim Leben meiner Schwester (Originaltitel: My Sister's Keeper) ist ein US-​amerikanisches Filmdrama aus dem Jahr Regie führte Nick Cassavetes, die. My Sister's Keeper: A Novel | Picoult, Jodi | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Inhaltsangabe zu "My Sister's Keeper". Anna is not sick, but she might as well be. By age thirteen, she has undergone countless surgeries, transfusions and.

My Sisters Keeper Video

My Sister's Keeper (2009) Official Trailer - Cameron Diaz, Abigail Breslin Movie HD my sisters keeper my sisters keeper In all thirteen years of Anna's life, her parents have never given her a choice: she was born to be her here Kate's bone marrow donor and she has always given Kate bs.to overlord she needs. Ich denke, dass man mehr click daraus machen können. Dieter Klebsch. Das Buch wirft die grundlegenden aller ethischen Fragen auf: wann ist ein Leben lebenswert und wie weit darf man dafür gehen. Jedes Kapitel wird aus here Ich-Sicht erzählt. Anna ist 13 Jahre und unter besonderen Umständen geboren. Funny, sad, moving, hopeful, here

In the end, Anna is granted medical emancipation from her parents. Even still, Anna considers giving her kidney to Kate.

On one hand she doesn't want to lose her sister, but another part of her realizes her life may be better once Kate is dead. But we never learn what Anna decides in the end, because the author commits the ultimate cop out.

She kills Anna off. Anna gets into a horrible car accident where she's conveniently made brain dead, but still physically alive so her organs can be harvested.

That's right! Kate gets her kidney after all and lives! This ending was complete bullshit. The ethical and moral questions that set this book up were abandoned in the end.

In the end, no tough decisions needed to be made. Eight years later, Kate is alive and well. Her parents, although deeply effected by Anna's death, have managed to pull themselves back together.

We're told that Brian, the father, had a drinking problem for a while after Anna's death, but not to worry - he clawed his way back to the family.

Good for him. How nice; glad that whole setting elementary schools on fire stage passed for him.

I felt that throughout the book the author was making a case for Anna and how invisible she felt in her own family. Anna desperately wanted to be in charge of her own life.

Anna wanted to be seen as an individual, not Kate's lifeline. Instead of Kate always being giving a chance, Anna wanted a chance to become her own person.

In the end, her creator, her author, didn't even care enough to find out what that might mean.

View all 92 comments. Aug 14, Lindsay rated it did not like it Recommends it for: Jodi Picoult fans, chick lit fans.

Shelves: misc. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Have you ever read a book that really pissed you off?

Pissed you off so much all you could do was rant about it until everyone told you to just shut up? This is that book for me.

Picoult's dialogue is excellent, but her characters annoy me and the ending of this book was such a cop-out I almost wrote her an angry letter about it, but decided against it, as she'd never read it anyway.

Basically, "My Sister's Keeper" is about a family with three kids - I forget their real names, so I'm giving them f Have you ever read a book that really pissed you off?

Mom and Dad find out about Leukemia's unfortunate diagnosis when she's just two, so they decide to have another baby - not to replace Leukemia when she inevitably bites it, but to provide Leukemia with spare parts for organ transplants.

Spare Parts gets tired of being held back by her sister's needs - and in turn, Leukemia gets tired of holding her sister back; Spare Parts isn't allowed to go to overnight camp and is being forced to quit playing her favorite sport because Leukemia needs a new kidney.

Spare Parts goes to a lawyer in an attempt to get medical emancipation from her parents. She winds up winning it, but dies in a car crash.

Mom pulls the plug immediately, Leukemia gets a new kidney, and - even better - Leukemia is magically cured of her illness altogether.

Also, there was a stupid subplot about the lawyer and social worker falling in love. The mother character annoyed me the most here; she didn't love her daughters equally, and it showed.

It really showed. She loved Leukemia the way you love a child. She loved Spare Parts the way you love that child's trust fund or college savings.

She played favorites and made no attempt to hide it. This whole book infuriated me - the very idea of having another kid just so your sick child can have her own personal organ bank sickens me.

It really does. You're supposed to have a child because you will love that child, not to fill the needs of another child. View all comments.

May 28, Lisa rated it it was ok. As I said before: I'm still reading this book but I'm not sure why.

My mom lent me the book and she loved it, everyone tells me they loved it and I'm sort of hating it while I read. I just want to finish it and move on.

Maybe I'll change my tune when it's over. I hate it less, but I'm still not in love with it.

I think I know the problem, though. It's Jodi Picoult. My mom loves her, my sister loves her, everyone I know loves her and I can't stand her.

She just writes in this odd way that As I said before: I'm still reading this book but I'm not sure why. She just writes in this odd way that gets on my nerves.

She made not so subtle comparisons to the stars and the lonely people on earth, to a fire and a disease, a firefighter and a mother who wants to save her dying daughter.

I couldn't take it. But I know it's just me and that other people are going to love this story. I thought I knew how it was going to end but when it ended differently that I expected, my thought was "Oh yeah, I should have figured that one out.

Much sappier than my prediction. I have the same feelings toward Alice Hoffman and Anita Shreve. I once found an Anita Shreve book in the basement of the house I moved into, crammed under the oil tank.

Never one to pass up a book, I gave it a read, got two chapters in and wanted to throw it back under the oil tank myself.

I think these authors try too hard and that's what irritates me. But don't let me stop you. Just don't say I didn't warn you.

View all 42 comments. Shelves: least-favorite-of-all-time. View all 25 comments. Aug 01, Bex rated it did not like it Recommends it for: No one.

This was a horrible read. Premise: Great. Should be really interesting. Execution: Terrible. Ending: Basically the worst ending I've ever read in anything.

Wish: I wish someone had spoken up after the first read and called out the author on some of the really bad plot devices and decisions in this book.

Just like someone should have stopped George Lucas before Episodes This could have been good- really good. But it just wasn't.

View all 22 comments. May 18, jessica rated it it was ok. View all 8 comments. May 29, Sammy rated it it was amazing Shelves: a-the-best.

This book was stunning. In writing, in style, in plot, in character! It truly is one of those books that you really can't stop reading.

Especially for me, because in a way it took me back to my Lurlene McDaniel days. Did anyone ever read her?

She was always writing books about different teenagers and young children with terminal illnesses.

I was addicted to those books. So it was no surprise when the young reader in me sort of jumped up when I saw a friend of mine reading this book and she descr This book was stunning.

So it was no surprise when the young reader in me sort of jumped up when I saw a friend of mine reading this book and she described it to me.

Boy was it a book well chosen. Picoult writes from the views of a few different key characters, allowing the reader to get an extremely well-rounded look at the story.

At first the jumping from character to character is a little jarring and you have to keep reminding yourself that it's a new character, but eventually you get into the vibe of the book and wouldn't have it written any other way.

The one thing Picoult does perfectly is make you torn. You really don't know who to support in a case like this.

At times you find yourself leaning towards Anna, and other times wanting desperately to shout your support for Sara, the poor mother in this situation.

With the readers information of other characters points of views and knowledge, the whole case is a lot more difficult to have a desired verdict towards.

In the end a decision is made, a decision that, while reading the book, I was constantly wondering what Picoult was going to do, because either way one fully supported side was going to lose.

But the way she really ends the book puts results to rest in a solid, yet emotionally unsatisfying ending. The ending it by no means bad, quite the contrary it was beautiful and settling, but at the same time you don't know whether to be relieved that there was an extremely closed ending without debate, or to cry.

I won't tell you why, and I may have said too much already. But this book is just incredible and I highly advise you try to read it as soon as possible.

View all 18 comments. Jun 05, Penny rated it it was ok Shelves: wish-i-could-unread , chick-lit , disappointing , reviewed-books.

Anyone who has a kid has probably, at one point or another, battled with them at bedtime. That's what I do, every night.

There is much yelling, crying, begging and pleading. It's horrible. Kid 3 is out like a light, so she's not part of the problem.

Kid 2 puts up a good fight, whining and tantrum throwing, but eventually she succumbs to her sleepiness. Kid 1, however At night, she's afraid of everything and feels that if she sleeps something will get he Anyone who has a kid has probably, at one point or another, battled with them at bedtime.

At night, she's afraid of everything and feels that if she sleeps something will get her. But she's not invincible, she has to sleep sometime.

So after being assured that she's safe, she'll lay down and relax--this can only happen in the master bedroom, because in her mind the master bedroom is safe from everything.

Once she's been lulled into blissful unconsciousness either me or my husband will move her to her room. Typically this goes off without a hitch.

But every once in a great while she wakes up and totally freaks out, because she realizes she was tricked. By her own parents, no less.

She feels betrayed. She doesn't believe us when we swear that we won't move her again because we will and she knows it. And so, because of her her general mistrust, her fear of everything, not to mention all the sobbing, she is awake for another couple of hours, at least.

The whole situation is very dramatic and it totally sucks. How does this relate to My Sister's Keeper?

It doesn't--not exactly but I do have a point. Let me explain. I spent years avoiding Jody Picoult's books like the plague.

They frightened me. I don't know why. Perhaps it's the fact that every woman over thirty can't stop raving about Jody Picoult books, which means they're probably not my 'cuppa tea'.

It may even have something to do with the fact that the woman has the ability to crank these insanely thick books out like she's some sort of writing machine from hell.

I don't know, it just doesn't seem natural. Besides, no author is capable of writing so fast. At least, no good author can do such a thing, amirite?

But finally, after being assured that Jody is actually quite talented, that her books are intriguing and worthwhile, I relented and picked up Nineteen Minutes.

And you know what? It wasn't horrible. Actually, I kind of liked it. Alright, I admit it--I liked it a lot. It wasn't the best book ever, but it was the sort of book that makes you think, stays with you after you're finished reading it.

So I immediately picked up My Sister's Keeper. And I liked it too. In fact, I was only half way through the book when I was positive I'd be giving it four stars.

Sure the sub-plot about the lawyer and the child advocate falling in love was incredibly stupid, but could I blame Jody for throwing it in?

I'm sure her target audience expects that sort of thing to be in every book they ever read. So I was willing to forgive it. I even forgave all the cheesy cliches.

Because sometimes I'm able to ignore stupid subplots, ridiculous cliches, irritating characters and by irritating I mean 'so monstrous they deserve to die a horribly drawn-out and painful death'.

Yes, I'm talking about the mother in this book , formulaic--that's a word, right? It happened when I was reading Twilight and it happened while I was reading this book.

Besides, I'd already come to the conclusion that I'd like this book because I liked Nineteen Minutes. I even had visions of myself adding Jodi Picoult to my list of favorite authors, adding the whole of Jodi Picoult's published works to my TBR list, happily reading said books on the beach over summer break-- it was going to be so awesome!

But then, when I was nearly finished with this book, Jodi Picoult went and ruined everything. I don't even have the desire to finish this book.

I feel manipulated, betrayed, lied to, cheated, and totally violated! I also feel incredibly stupid for thinking that Jodi Picoult was a good writer.

Because she's not. She totally sucks and I hate her. Even though I've wasted hours of my life reading, and thinking about, Jodi Picoult novels, it hasn't been all bad.

I've learned two things from this whole experience. First, I should trust my initial instincts when it comes to books.

Second, I'm an a-hole for lying to my kid. It's no wonder she doesn't trust me, and she'll probably need years of therapy because of it.

I wouldn't blame her if she threw me in a really bad nursing home someday. I gave this book two stars because it isn't horrible until the end.

That's when Picoult whips out the most manipulative, unnecessary twist, and thus ruins the whole experience.

Now let us never speak of this again. View all 16 comments. Mar 22, Nola Redd rated it really liked it Recommends it for: parents, christians,.

Shelves: fiction-drama. After reading the summary of the novel, I knew that I would never make the choices that the parents shown did.

After reading the novel, I found myself questioning what I might really do if my child was facing death.

By the time she is thirteen, when the novel takes place, she has been in the hospital almost as much as Kate, donating things such as blood and bone marrow.

After being asked to donate a kidney, she seeks legal emancipation from her parents. And so the story begins.

One of the things that bugged me was the chapter-by-chapter switch of the point of view. It was very well handled and, once I got past the irritation stage, I had to admit that it helped the story along.

And so we skip through the minds of Anna, her lawyer, her court-appointed guardian ad litem, her brother, her father, and her mother — in short, everyone close to Anna except her sister.

Each of these perspectives is given in the present, with the notable exception of her mother. It would have been far easier to judge her at that point than it was to see her experiencing her pain.

If my young daughter, the light of my life, was threatened with death, how far would I go to save her? Furthermore, it is clear that Sara loves and cherishes Anna, even as she worries incessantly over Katie.

True, she neglects her, but she also neglects her son, who had been born prior to the diagnosis, turning most of her attention to her sick child.

And though this also made me pass judgement, it also made me wonder — would I be able to balance my attention on all my children if one were struggling through a life-long illness?

How easy would it be to make small decisions that hurt the others to save the one? In short, I hated this well-written, well-developed, well-plotted book because it made me think.

The moral and religious side of me rejects the notion of a test-tube baby conceived for a specific purpose, but the mother in me wonders.

If someone threatened my child, how far would I go to protect them? In short, when it comes down to crunch time, how true would I stay?

To fall asleep, I have to assure myself that I would, of course, be perfect in all things. And then knock soundly on the nearest wood, and pray I never have to find out.

View all 5 comments. Mar 15, Richard Derus rated it did not like it Shelves: pearl-ruled. Rating: fifteen one-thousandths of a single star out of five; p44 UPDATE Anyone who thinks that this idea of growing a new kid for replacement parts is a good idea should read Altered Carbon or watch the glossy, gritty Netflix show.

Many are the yodels of praise for this horrifying book. The details of the main character's use as a farm animal for a more-favored older sibling are too grisly to recount without vomiting on my keyboard.

People die. Even when we don't want them to, and even when Rating: fifteen one-thousandths of a single star out of five; p44 UPDATE Anyone who thinks that this idea of growing a new kid for replacement parts is a good idea should read Altered Carbon or watch the glossy, gritty Netflix show.

Even when we don't want them to, and even when it hurts for them to, and even when we've given them life.

It's happened to me. Anyone who does that should be jailed. View all 26 comments. Nov 03, Rita rated it did not like it Shelves: hated.

Spoiler Alert. This review contains spoilers. I hated this book so much. I only kept reading it because I had to find out why Campbell, the lawyer, had a service dog, since he kept that such a secret.

I hated the overwrought melodrama. Everything was just so saturated with heavy-handed tear-jerking prose that the book was soggy and Spoiler Alert.

Everything was just so saturated with heavy-handed tear-jerking prose that the book was soggy and just about dripping. About halfway through the book, I started skimming it, looking for dialogue relevant to the plot.

If I was ever to find out why Campbell had that dog, then I needed to get through the material faster. Putting the book down to groan out loud every few paragraphs was taking too long.

The characters were two-dimensional and irritating. They really were just like paper dolls, given name tags, dressed up in stereotypes and given lines to say and melodramatic thoughts to spill out.

Waggle lawyer paper doll and have him blah blah blah, and so on. The plot was all right through all of that until the big Law and Order courtroom twist at the end.

That was just a convenient trick to get out of actually trying to find a solution for such a dilemma. She worked it up to such a point that there was no way out that would sit well with an audience, there was no good way to wrap it up, so she pulled a rabbit out of a hat.

Otherwise, I would have been furious with such an ending. It tells the story of thirteen-year-old Anna Fitzgerald, who sues her parents for medical emancipation when she discovers she was supposed to donate a kidney to her elder sister Kate, who is gradually dying from acute leukemia.

The story takes place in the fictional town of Upper Darby, Rhode Island in Anna Fitzgerald's older sister, Kate, suffers from acute leukemia, a blood and bone marrow cancer.

Anna was born as a savior sister specifically so she could save Kate's life. At first it is successful, but the cancer continues to relapse throughout Kate's life.

Anna is usually willing to donate whatever Kate needs, but when she turns 13, she is told that she will have to donate one of her kidneys due to Kate's kidney failure.

The surgery required for both Kate and Anna would be major; it is not guaranteed to work, as the stress of the operation may kill Kate anyway, and the loss of a kidney could have a serious impact on Anna's life.

Anna petitions for medical emancipation with the help of lawyer Campbell Alexander, so she will be able to make her own decisions regarding her medical treatment and the donation of her kidney.

View all 6 comments. Jan 13, Peter rated it it was amazing Shelves: literary-fiction. Emancipation My Sister's Keeper is a hugely compelling novel that explores an agonising moral dilemma of doing everything possible for your child - but can you choose between your children.

It is heart-breaking, sensitive, compassionate and superbly written to bring a serious illness and portray it through a novel. The premise is that Sara and Brian have a child Kate with Leukaemia and decide to have another daughter, Anna, to provide a kidney transplant and stem cells for Kate, if and most lik Emancipation My Sister's Keeper is a hugely compelling novel that explores an agonising moral dilemma of doing everything possible for your child - but can you choose between your children.

The premise is that Sara and Brian have a child Kate with Leukaemia and decide to have another daughter, Anna, to provide a kidney transplant and stem cells for Kate, if and most likely when, needed in the future.

The plans go completely awry when Anna decides that she has her own life and will make her own decisions about her body, and decides to take legal steps towards medical emancipation from her parents.

Not only the physical suffering but the emotional and spiritual torment. It is very difficult to develop relationships with other patients and then deal with the deaths that occur.

The tight bond that disappears in a moment! Utterly heart-breaking as it often breaks your hope that this illness is survivable.

My Sister's Keeper is an incredibly sad story and having watched a family member die of Leukaemia, it replayed all the same tragic decisions and experiences.

I felt Jodi Picoult captured the emotions and mental anguish so wonderfully. It was really authentic! If you suffered agonising moments throughout the book, the final twist will leave you floored.

May 28, Mischenko rated it it was amazing. Leave it to Jodi Picoult to captivate me from cover to cover. I read this in and remember that I couldn't put this down until the final shocking end.

Sara's daughter Kate is sick. She has leukemia and Sara will do whatever it takes to keep her alive.

When Anna is born, she quickly becomes her sister Kate's savior, but as time goes on, Anna wants a life of her own. Or are you always a sister, even when the other half of the equation is gone?

I didn't come to see her because it would make me feel better. I came because without her, it's hard to remember who I am.

Who is it that's right when not one of them is sure of their own decisions on this controversial matter? I couldn't put the book down. Picoult has the capability of twisting a story so far that you can never figure out what's ahead or how it'll end.

I love the way she writes and she's one of my favorite authors. This is just one of my favorite books by her. View all 13 comments. We tell ourselves that it's the right thing to do, the altruistic thing to do.

It's far easier than telling ourselves the truth. And this is how Anna is born. The girl who has never belonged to herself, whose light has been smothered before having even touched the surface of her existence.

You know how most little kids think they're like cartoon characters - if an anvil drops on their heads they can peel themselves off the sidewalk and keep going?

Well, I never once believed that. How could I, when we practically set a place for Death at the dinner table?

As a former lawyer, Sara sometimes doubts her decision to give up her career in the name of the family.

She struggles with it. But when doubts go away, do we stop fighting? Sara keeps struggling. Even though she is confident in her choice.

Does pain go away along with doubts? Not always. Sometimes it is exactly when we know that we are right that the pain is the strongest.

When Anna files a lawsuit against her parents, wanting a medical emancipation, she has no doubt that her daughter is in the wrong, that she wants to escape her responsibility to keep the family together by keeping her sister alive.

When we cannot save those we are responsible for, do we have the right to bestow this responsibility on someone else and expect them to act as we would?

Even Anna herself cannot give us the response. She is not confident in her choices, because, really, she is faced with an impossible situation.

Sometimes there is no right choice, there is not a happy ending, there are no heroes and villains. Only doubts.

There is no right path for Anna. No matter what she chooses, she cannot live with it, she cannot be happy, she cannot forgive herself.

Dying physically is only one form of dying. Through the many ifs and maybes and missed or wrongly chosen opportunities we face. For her it is over before having even begun.

There is only so much we have the right to create. I do believe in the noble motives of Sara Fitzgerald, but I do not believe in the validity of her choice.

All her love and care for Anna do not make up for that. And the universe seems to agree with her.

She never gets to make the choice she so dreads of. At the time she finally receives her much craved freedom, she leaves this world.

The child that never had to exist stops existing. There is no more struggle, no more dilemmas. It is over. It turns out that after all these years I have spent anticipating this, I am completely at loss.

Like coloring the sky in with a crayon; there is no language for grief this big. I wait for a change. And then I feel it, as her heart stops beating beneath my palm - that tiny loss of rhythm, that hollow calm, that utter loss.

There are no more relapses. But what life will Kate have from now on? Will she be able to handle the cost at which she has it?

When I start to feel this way I go into the bathroom and I lift up my shirt and touch the white lines of my scar. I remember how, at first, I thought the stitches seemed to spell out her name.

I think about her kidney working inside me and her blood running through my veins. I take her with me, wherever I go. When we offer somebody a gift, especially the gift of life, we do not always realize or want to realize what we offer them along with it.

Do I believe that it was better for Anna to die than to have to live dealing with the consequences of how she was brought to this world?

Do I believe she should have been born at all? The answer again is no. I do not believe that our survival and the one of those we love is worth all cost.

After all is said and done, she still ends up with a dead child and those she is left with are scarred for life.

But I do not blame her for it. I understand her and I feel for her. I think that it is understandable why someone in her situation cannot see things the way I describe them.

It is understandable why she cannot fathom the consequences and the price that comes with her choices.

Sometimes the right thing is too much to ask for. Often right and wrong are not even part of the equation. In a battle in which there are no winners, where there is no right and wrong, where all you can count on are your instincts, hoping that they are there for a reason, that they mean something, that in the end they are worth more than any moral that chains you when you are desperately trying to break free and take a step, any step that may turn the wheel, break the glass, chase away the shadow, bring back the pulse in your body, you know better than to hope that you will keep your hands clean.

All you have is the hope that when the battle is over, you will have the strength to pick up the bodies and bury them. Read count: View all 35 comments.

Jun 17, K. Absolutely rated it it was ok Recommended to K. Shelves: hospital-drama , saddest , banned , drama.

My first book written by Jodi Picoult born and I had mixed feelings about it. I don't know if I hate or love it so I just rate this with 2 stars that in Goodreads means, It's okay.

I have a friend in the office who is a solid Jodi Picoult fan. She encouraged me to read this a couple of years back as my intro to Picoult's world.

I took the book home, read the first 10 pages, closed it and gave the book back to her the following morning.

My reason? Suing one's parents is very un-Filipino, IMHO and I don't think it will happen in the Philippines because Filipinos are reared to be God-fearing and God commands us to respect our parents so I think that situation is unrealistic.

It is something I can't relate with. However, the Filipinos group here in Goodreads chose this book last month as our bestseller read.

I tried reading it within the schedule but again, I got stuck in the first few pages. I still could not make me accept that suing part but I went on reading but when I encountered that backstory about Anna's conception just to be the perfect donor for her older sister Kate , I again back off as it is again another unrealistic point: couples decide to have children because they love each other and children are proof of that love.

Children are not created to serve as organ donors unless we are talking here of Kazuo Ishiguro's mileau in his Never Let Me Go.

Thank God for the long weekend I had the time to finish some of my stalled books in my currently-reading folder.

This one included. I am glad I finished the book. It's still worth the time. It is a nicely written book.

Multiple narrators and POVs. In Los Angeles, the eleven year old Anna Fitzgerald seeks the successful lawyer Campbell Alexander trying to hire him to earn medical emancipation from her mother Sara that wants Anna to donate her kidney to her sister.

She tells the lawyer the story of her family after the discovery that her older sister Kate has had leukemia; how she was conceived by in vitro fertilization to become a donor; and the medical procedures she has been submitted since she was five years old to donate to her sister.

Campbell accepts to work pro bono and the obsessed Sara decides to go to court to force Anna to help her sister. Anna Fitzgerald was conceived via in vitro so that her parents could have a genetic match and donor for their older daughter, Kate who has leukemia.

But after years being tested and prodded, Anna decides to take her parents to court herself so that she could be emancipated from them when it comes to anything medical.

But her mother refuses to it so the whole thing goes to court. And it nearly tears the family apart. Using the latest medical technology, Anna Fitzgerald, was conceived in vitro and was genetically created to be a perfect match donor child for her sister Kate who has leukemia.

Now at 11 years old, Anna seeks the help of Attorney Campbell Alexander to gain medical emancipation from her parents, more specifically her mother Sara.

Anna brings to the attention of everyone around her that she matters too. She has helped keep her sister alive for 11 years, has gone through multiple medical procedures and surgeries, but she draws the line at donating her kidney.

Sara, the girls mother, is beside herself with anger and only sees one side After Anna files a lawsuit against her parents Sara decides to take this matter to court so Anna isn't emancipated and has to help Kate.

My Sister's Keeper - () - Netflix Anna Fitzgerald looks to earn medical emancipation from her parents who until now have relied on their youngest child to. Many translated example sentences containing "my sister's keeper" – German-​English dictionary and search engine for German translations. Inhaltsangabe zu "My Sister's Keeper". Anna is not sick, but she might as well be. By age thirteen, she has undergone countless surgeries, transfusions and. Thalia: Infos zu Autor, Inhalt und Bewertungen ❤ Jetzt»My Sister's Keeper«nach Hause oder Ihre Filiale vor Ort bestellen!

My Sisters Keeper Video

My Sister's Keeper (2009) Official Trailer - Cameron Diaz, Abigail Breslin Movie HD In click to see more thirteen years of Anna's life, her parents have never given her a choice: she was born to be her sister Kate's bone marrow donor and she has always given Kate everything she needs. War es richtig von Annas Eltern? But unlike read article teenagers, she link always been defined in terms of her sister. Mehr von Jodi Picoult. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Fazit: Die Idee der Geschichte ist super, die Umsetzung der Story hat mich nicht vollkommen überzeugt. Stöbern in Romane Weitere Romane. Das Buch bildet die Vorlage für eine Verfilmung, die am Die Charaktere link auf geniale Art und Weise read more und wirken durch ihre gründliche Ausgestaltung lebendig. Sonst würde der Film wohl für manchen Zuschauer zu schwere See more sein. Erste Bewertung verfassen. Sara gibt für die Pflege ihres Kindes ihren Job und nach und nach ihre ganze Persönlichkeit auf. Monstermiri vor einem Jahr. Beim Leben meiner Schwester. Habe das Buch auf Englisch gelesen und kann es auch auf Englisch article source. Schade nur, dass dabei Kate wenig zu erzählen hat, click at this page mich sehr interessiert, wie sie ihre Situation schildert.

After Anna files a lawsuit against her parents Sara decides to take this matter to court so Anna isn't emancipated and has to help Kate.

Will Anna win the legal medical emancipation lawsuit and be free to decide what is done to her body?

Or will the judge decide Anna is too young? Bigger question is Sign In. Edit My Sister's Keeper Jump to: Summaries 4 Synopsis 1.

The synopsis below may give away important plot points. Edit page. The film received mixed reviews from critics.

The website's critical consensus reads, " My Sister's Keeper gets fine performances from its adult and child actors, but the director's heavy-handed approach turns a worthy emotional subject into an overly melodramatic tearjerker.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Theatrical release poster. New Line Cinema Curmudgeon Films. Chance Thomas Dekker as Taylor Ambrose.

Duo replaces Fanning sisters in New Line film". Retrieved February 13, Box Office Mojo. Retrieved January 12, February 13, Rotten Tomatoes.

Retrieved April 30, Retrieved January 15, Films directed by Nick Cassavetes. Organ transplantation in fiction.

Organ trade Organlegging Brain transplantation Body horror. Categories : films English-language films s legal drama films American films American legal drama films Films about cancer Films about death Films about dysfunctional families Films about lawyers Films about sisters Films based on works by Jodi Picoult Films directed by Nick Cassavetes Films set in California drama films.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Meanwhile, Anna's older brother, Jesse, who has spent most of his life being ignored in favor of ill Kate or donor Anna, spends most of his time setting fire to abandoned buildings with homemade explosives and using illegal drugs.

He is a self-confessed juvenile delinquent , which leads to their father Brian eventually confronting Jesse for his behavior.

During the trial, it is revealed that Anna is acting under her sister's wishes: Kate is tired of living; she's ready to die and doesn't want to force Anna to donate a kidney that will likely not be enough to save her life, so she encouraged Anna to gain the independence that has always been denied to her.

As Anna stands up to testify, Campbell Alexander has an epileptic seizure and, thanks to this, Julia discovers the reason of their breakup, leading her to swear to Campbell that he doesn't need to hide his illness from her, and they can be together.

The judge rules in Anna's favor, and grants Campbell a medical power of attorney. After gaining medical emancipation, Anna hints that she plans to donate her kidney to Kate, wanting her sister to live.

However, as Campbell drives her home after the trial, their car is t-boned by a truck. The on-call firefighter , who happens to be Brian, Anna's father, who arrives at the scene, retrieves an unconscious and severely injured Anna from the wreckage of the crushed car.

Anna goes into cardiac arrest and is revived, but when she and Campbell are rushed to the hospital, the doctor informs Sara and Brian that Anna is brain-dead and asks them if they have considered organ donation.

An injured Campbell steps in and declares that he, as the one who has the power of attorney, allows the donation and Anna's kidney is successfully transplanted.

Kate survives the surgery but Sara and Brian are devastated: after so many years lived hoping to not see their first daughter die, the death of Anna is something completely unexpected and utterly unfair, but there's nothing anyone can do so the life-support machines are shut off.

After eight years, the Fitzgerald family is still struggling to cope: Jesse has reformed, graduated from the police academy, and has been awarded by the mayor for his work in uncovering drugs; Campbell Alexander and Julia Romano are married, but they don't often meet up with the Fitzgerald family, as the memory of Anna's death is too painful; both Sara and Brian needed years to accept their daughter's death, while Kate has recovered from her leukemia and has become a ballet teacher.

She still feels deeply guilty, believing that Anna's death could have been avoided if she didn't push her to sue their parents, but feels relieved remembering that a part of Anna keeps living inside her through the kidney that, at the end, truly managed to save her life.

Picoult, Jodi. My Sister's Keeper. In review for The Washington Post , Katherine Arie described some of the characters as unconvincing, such as Brian, who is "too good to be true", Jesse, "a poster child for self-destructive behavior", and Kate, who is "as weak and wispy on the page as she's supposed to be in life", but ultimately called the book "a thrill to read".

The film features an alternate ending and more emphasis on certain subplots while entirely eliminating others. This was against the wishes of Picoult.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For the film adaptation, see My Sister's Keeper film.

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Aunt Kelly Jason Patric Even when we don't want them to, and even when it hurts for them to, and even when we've given error. kolonie have life. This web page is hard not to be sympathetic to neuer kinofilm in the book. She loved Leukemia please click for source way you love a child. Once is. Mom and Dad find out about Leukemia's unfortunate diagnosis when she's just two, so they decide to have another baby - not to replace Leukemia when she inevitably bites it, but to provide Leukemia with spare parts for organ transplants.

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